Sebastião
Weber


Sebastião Salgado
Winner of the EPSON Creativity Award



AgeNcy: Amazonas-Contact Press images
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
DePUTy PHOTO eDiTOr: Joanna Milter
ASSOciATe PHOTO eDiTOr: Luise Stauss
DeSigN DirecTOr: Arem Duplessis
ArT DirecTOr: Gail Bichler
DePUTy ArT DirecTOr: Caleb Bennett
"Another World, Another Planet: Alaska's North." Seeking a pristine land untouched by humanity, Sebastião Salgado photographed the Arctic National Wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Sebastião Salgado
Winner of the EPSON Creativity Award



AgeNcy: Amazonas-Contact Press images
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
DePUTy PHOTO eDiTOr: Joanna Milter
ASSOciATe PHOTO eDiTOr: Luise Stauss
DeSigN DirecTOr: Arem Duplessis
ArT DirecTOr: Gail Bichler
DePUTy ArT DirecTOr: Caleb Bennett
"Another World, Another Planet: Alaska's North." Seeking a pristine land untouched by humanity, Sebastião Salgado photographed the Arctic National Wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Sebastião Salgado
Winner of the EPSON Creativity Award



AgeNcy: Amazonas-Contact Press images
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
DePUTy PHOTO eDiTOr: Joanna Milter
ASSOciATe PHOTO eDiTOr: Luise Stauss
DeSigN DirecTOr: Arem Duplessis
ArT DirecTOr: Gail Bichler
DePUTy ArT DirecTOr: Caleb Bennett
"Another World, Another Planet: Alaska's North." Seeking a pristine land untouched by humanity, Sebastião Salgado photographed the Arctic National Wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska.
(Image 3 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Sebastião Salgado
Winner of the EPSON Creativity Award



AgeNcy: Amazonas-Contact Press images
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
DePUTy PHOTO eDiTOr: Joanna Milter
ASSOciATe PHOTO eDiTOr: Luise Stauss
DeSigN DirecTOr: Arem Duplessis
ArT DirecTOr: Gail Bichler
DePUTy ArT DirecTOr: Caleb Bennett
"Another World, Another Planet: Alaska's North." Seeking a pristine land untouched by humanity, Sebastião Salgado photographed the Arctic National Wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska.
(Image 4 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Sebastião Salgado
Winner of the EPSON Creativity Award



AgeNcy: Amazonas-Contact Press images
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
DePUTy PHOTO eDiTOr: Joanna Milter
ASSOciATe PHOTO eDiTOr: Luise Stauss
DeSigN DirecTOr: Arem Duplessis
ArT DirecTOr: Gail Bichler
DePUTy ArT DirecTOr: Caleb Bennett
"Another World, Another Planet: Alaska's North." Seeking a pristine land untouched by humanity, Sebastião Salgado photographed the Arctic National Wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska.
(Image 5 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Sebastião Salgado
Winner of the EPSON Creativity Award



AgeNcy: Amazonas-Contact Press images
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
DePUTy PHOTO eDiTOr: Joanna Milter
ASSOciATe PHOTO eDiTOr: Luise Stauss
DeSigN DirecTOr: Arem Duplessis
ArT DirecTOr: Gail Bichler
DePUTy ArT DirecTOr: Caleb Bennett
"Another World, Another Planet: Alaska's North." Seeking a pristine land untouched by humanity, Sebastião Salgado photographed the Arctic National Wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Yuri
Kozyrev


Yuri Kozyrev
AgencY: NOOR
publicAtion: TIME
Director of photogrAphY: Kira Pollack
internAtionAl picture eDitor: Patrick Witty
Libyan rebels in Ras Lanuf, Libya, on March 3, 2011.


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Wei Seng
Chen


Wei Seng Chen
A jockey astride a harness strapped to two bulls takes part in Pacu Jawi or bull race, an event held after the rice harvest season in west Sumatera, Indonesia.


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Tim
Hetherington


Tim Hetherington
AgeNcy: Magnum
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
creATive DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
OverseAs DesigN DirecTOr: Leah Purcell
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Scott Hall
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
"Witness to War." An image from the last series of photos taken by Tim Hetherington before his death.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Tim Hetherington
AgeNcy: Magnum
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
creATive DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
OverseAs DesigN DirecTOr: Leah Purcell
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Scott Hall
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
"Witness to War." An image from the last series of photos taken by Tim Hetherington before his death.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Tim Hetherington
AgeNcy: Magnum
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
creATive DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
OverseAs DesigN DirecTOr: Leah Purcell
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Scott Hall
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
"Witness to War." An image from the last series of photos taken by Tim Hetherington before his death.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Tim Hetherington
AgeNcy: Magnum
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
creATive DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
OverseAs DesigN DirecTOr: Leah Purcell
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Scott Hall
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
"Witness to War." An image from the last series of photos taken by Tim Hetherington before his death.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Tim Hetherington
AgeNcy: Magnum
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
creATive DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
OverseAs DesigN DirecTOr: Leah Purcell
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Scott Hall
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
"Witness to War." An image from the last series of photos taken by Tim Hetherington before his death.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Tim Hetherington
AgeNcy: Magnum
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
creATive DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
OverseAs DesigN DirecTOr: Leah Purcell
DirecTOr Of PHOTOgrAPHy: Scott Hall
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
"Witness to War." An image from the last series of photos taken by Tim Hetherington before his death.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Toni
Greaves


Toni Greaves
PUbLicATiON: British Journal of Photography
"Radical Love, The Promise." Sister Maria Teresa (formerly Lauren Franko) became a cloistered nun at the age of 21. Now 24, she has spent the past three years leading a hidden life of prayer and ritual, shielding herself from the outside world in order to focus on the spiritual realm and a higher calling of praying to save all souls. since entering the monastery she has gone through both her Clothing Ceremony (engagement to God) and first Profession (initial phase of marrying god). The Promise is a chapter that explores ritual and commitment as she journeys forth into the deepening of her spiritual path.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Toni Greaves
PUbLicATiON: British Journal of Photography
"Radical Love, The Promise." Sister Maria Teresa (formerly Lauren Franko) became a cloistered nun at the age of 21. Now 24, she has spent the past three years leading a hidden life of prayer and ritual, shielding herself from the outside world in order to focus on the spiritual realm and a higher calling of praying to save all souls. since entering the monastery she has gone through both her Clothing Ceremony (engagement to God) and first Profession (initial phase of marrying god). The Promise is a chapter that explores ritual and commitment as she journeys forth into the deepening of her spiritual path.
(Image 2 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Toni Greaves
PUbLicATiON: British Journal of Photography
"Radical Love, The Promise." Sister Maria Teresa (formerly Lauren Franko) became a cloistered nun at the age of 21. Now 24, she has spent the past three years leading a hidden life of prayer and ritual, shielding herself from the outside world in order to focus on the spiritual realm and a higher calling of praying to save all souls. since entering the monastery she has gone through both her Clothing Ceremony (engagement to God) and first Profession (initial phase of marrying god). The Promise is a chapter that explores ritual and commitment as she journeys forth into the deepening of her spiritual path.
(Image 3 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Toni Greaves
PUbLicATiON: British Journal of Photography
"Radical Love, The Promise." Sister Maria Teresa (formerly Lauren Franko) became a cloistered nun at the age of 21. Now 24, she has spent the past three years leading a hidden life of prayer and ritual, shielding herself from the outside world in order to focus on the spiritual realm and a higher calling of praying to save all souls. since entering the monastery she has gone through both her Clothing Ceremony (engagement to God) and first Profession (initial phase of marrying god). The Promise is a chapter that explores ritual and commitment as she journeys forth into the deepening of her spiritual path.
(Image 4 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Toni Greaves
PUbLicATiON: British Journal of Photography
"Radical Love, The Promise." Sister Maria Teresa (formerly Lauren Franko) became a cloistered nun at the age of 21. Now 24, she has spent the past three years leading a hidden life of prayer and ritual, shielding herself from the outside world in order to focus on the spiritual realm and a higher calling of praying to save all souls. since entering the monastery she has gone through both her Clothing Ceremony (engagement to God) and first Profession (initial phase of marrying god). The Promise is a chapter that explores ritual and commitment as she journeys forth into the deepening of her spiritual path.
(Image 5 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Toni Greaves
PUbLicATiON: British Journal of Photography
"Radical Love, The Promise." Sister Maria Teresa (formerly Lauren Franko) became a cloistered nun at the age of 21. Now 24, she has spent the past three years leading a hidden life of prayer and ritual, shielding herself from the outside world in order to focus on the spiritual realm and a higher calling of praying to save all souls. since entering the monastery she has gone through both her Clothing Ceremony (engagement to God) and first Profession (initial phase of marrying god). The Promise is a chapter that explores ritual and commitment as she journeys forth into the deepening of her spiritual path.
(Image 6 of 6)

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2003700351 Riza Özel agency: Anadolu Agency
Publication: aa.com.tr
Photo eDitor: Gursel Eser
The current drought in Somalia is the worst in 60 years. Along with years of civil war, about 30,000 children under the age of 5 have been killed over the course of three to four months according to the United Nations which declared five regions in southern Somalia famine zones. The Somalia-based Al Qaeda affiliate known as Al Shabaab does not allow access to food aid.
Riza
Özel


Riza Özel
agency: Anadolu Agency
Publication: aa.com.tr
Photo eDitor: Gursel Eser
The current drought in Somalia is the worst in 60 years. Along with years of civil war, about 30,000 children under the age of 5 have been killed over the course of three to four months according to the United Nations which declared five regions in southern Somalia famine zones. The Somalia-based Al Qaeda affiliate known as Al Shabaab does not allow access to food aid.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Riza Özel
agency: Anadolu Agency
Publication: aa.com.tr
Photo eDitor: Gursel Eser
The current drought in Somalia is the worst in 60 years. Along with years of civil war, about 30,000 children under the age of 5 have been killed over the course of three to four months according to the United Nations which declared five regions in southern Somalia famine zones. The Somalia-based Al Qaeda affiliate known as Al Shabaab does not allow access to food aid.
(Image 2 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Riza Özel
agency: Anadolu Agency
Publication: aa.com.tr
Photo eDitor: Gursel Eser
The current drought in Somalia is the worst in 60 years. Along with years of civil war, about 30,000 children under the age of 5 have been killed over the course of three to four months according to the United Nations which declared five regions in southern Somalia famine zones. The Somalia-based Al Qaeda affiliate known as Al Shabaab does not allow access to food aid.
(Image 3 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Riza Özel
agency: Anadolu Agency
Publication: aa.com.tr
Photo eDitor: Gursel Eser
The current drought in Somalia is the worst in 60 years. Along with years of civil war, about 30,000 children under the age of 5 have been killed over the course of three to four months according to the United Nations which declared five regions in southern Somalia famine zones. The Somalia-based Al Qaeda affiliate known as Al Shabaab does not allow access to food aid.
(Image 4 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Riza Özel
agency: Anadolu Agency
Publication: aa.com.tr
Photo eDitor: Gursel Eser
The current drought in Somalia is the worst in 60 years. Along with years of civil war, about 30,000 children under the age of 5 have been killed over the course of three to four months according to the United Nations which declared five regions in southern Somalia famine zones. The Somalia-based Al Qaeda affiliate known as Al Shabaab does not allow access to food aid.
(Image 5 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Riza Özel
agency: Anadolu Agency
Publication: aa.com.tr
Photo eDitor: Gursel Eser
The current drought in Somalia is the worst in 60 years. Along with years of civil war, about 30,000 children under the age of 5 have been killed over the course of three to four months according to the United Nations which declared five regions in southern Somalia famine zones. The Somalia-based Al Qaeda affiliate known as Al Shabaab does not allow access to food aid.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Balazs
Gardi


Balazs Gardi
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"War Without End." Afghan security officers stand guard at the site of a suicide bomb attack outside the Kabul City Center shopping mall in Kabul on February 14, 2011.
(Image 1 of 5)

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Balazs Gardi
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"War Without End." An Afghan National Army soldier shelters his face with a plastic bag against a dust storm at Combat Outpost 7171 in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on October 28, 2010.
(Image 2 of 5)

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Balazs Gardi
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"War Without End." Residents walk on the street early morning in Kandahar, Afghanistan on February 24, 2011.
(Image 3 of 5)

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Balazs Gardi
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"War Without End." Kabul, Afghanistan. February 27, 2011. Ten-years-old refugee, Ali Mohammad, from Kandahar province stands in front of his makeshift house in Charahi Qambar refugee camp. He fled the fighting, arriving to Kabul with 40 family members over four years ago.
(Image 4 of 5)

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Balazs Gardi
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"War Without End." An elderly refugee from Helmand province listens a conversation at the Charahi Qambar refugee camp in Kabul, Afghanistan on February 27, 2011.
(Image 5 of 5)

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James
Nachtwey


James Nachtwey
Publication: TIME
Director oF PhotograPhy: Kira Pollack
international Picture eDitor: Patrick Witty
"The Day The Earth Moved." Kesenuma, Japan. Hit hard by the tsunami caused by the 8.9 earthquake.
(Image 1 of 6)

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James Nachtwey
Publication: TIME
Director oF PhotograPhy: Kira Pollack
international Picture eDitor: Patrick Witty
"The Day The Earth Moved." Under harsh conditions, police officers work to recover the remains of the dead in Rikuzentakata, Japan, on March 16, 2011.
(Image 2 of 6)

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James Nachtwey
Publication: TIME
Director oF PhotograPhy: Kira Pollack
international Picture eDitor: Patrick Witty
"The Day The Earth Moved." Kesenuma, Japan. Hit hard by the tsunami caused by the 8.9 earthquake.
(Image 3 of 6)

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James Nachtwey
Publication: TIME
Director oF PhotograPhy: Kira Pollack
international Picture eDitor: Patrick Witty
"The Day The Earth Moved." Under harsh conditions, police officers work to recover the remains of the dead in Rikuzentakata, Japan, on March 16, 2011.
(Image 4 of 6)

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James Nachtwey
Publication: TIME
Director oF PhotograPhy: Kira Pollack
international Picture eDitor: Patrick Witty
"The Day The Earth Moved." Kesenuma, Japan. Hit hard by the tsunami caused by the 8.9 earthquake.
(Image 5 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
James Nachtwey
Publication: TIME
Director oF PhotograPhy: Kira Pollack
international Picture eDitor: Patrick Witty
"The Day The Earth Moved." Rikugentakada, Japan. Hit hard by the tsunami caused by the 8.9 earthquake.
(Image 6 of 6)

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2003715717 Sebastián Liste AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PUbLicATiON: Sunday Times Magazine
PHOTO eDiTOr: Patrick Di Nola
"Urban Quilombo." Young girls fighting because they have a boyfriend in common, on December 17, 2010 in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. Despite the lack of socio-economic support from the government, squatters have managed to make a place for themselves to live and form a community of their own, which is safer than the alternatives available to them. However, they are currently being evicted by the government due to being there illegally.
Sebastián
Liste


Sebastián Liste
AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PUbLicATiON: Sunday Times Magazine
PHOTO eDiTOr: Patrick Di Nola
"Urban Quilombo." Young girls fighting because they have a boyfriend in common, on December 17, 2010 in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. Despite the lack of socio-economic support from the government, squatters have managed to make a place for themselves to live and form a community of their own, which is safer than the alternatives available to them. However, they are currently being evicted by the government due to being there illegally.
(Image 1 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Sebastián Liste
AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PUbLicATiON: Sunday Times Magazine
PHOTO eDiTOr: Patrick Di Nola
"Urban Quilombo." Ana celebrating her sith anniversary. She was born and has grown up inside the abandonated chocolate factory, on January 22, 2011 in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. Despite the lack of socio-economic support from the government, squatters have managed to make a place for themselves to live and form a community of their own, which is safer than the alternatives available to them. However, they are currently being evicted by the government due to being there illegally.
(Image 2 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Sebastián Liste
AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PUbLicATiON: Sunday Times Magazine
PHOTO eDiTOr: Patrick Di Nola
"Urban Quilombo." General vision of the countyard and the structure of the occupied chocolate factory, on March 3, 2011 in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. Despite the lack of socio-economic support from the government, squatters have managed to make a place for themselves to live and form a community of their own, which is safer than the alternatives available to them. However, they are currently being evicted by the government due to being there illegally.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Sebastián Liste
AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PUbLicATiON: Sunday Times Magazine
PHOTO eDiTOr: Patrick Di Nola
"Urban Quilombo." Young couples drinking beers on sunday evening, on May 9, 2010 in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. Despite the lack of socio-economic support from the government, squatters have managed to make a place for themselves to live and form a community of their own, which is safer than the alternatives available to them. However, they are currently being evicted by the government due to being there illegally.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Sebastián Liste
AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PUbLicATiON: Sunday Times Magazine
"Urban Quilombo." A man arguing in the communal showers on March 13, 2011, in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. Despite the lack of socio-economic support from the government, squatters have managed to make a place for themselves to live and form a community of their own, which is safer than the alternatives available to them. However, they are currently being evicted by the government due to being there illegally.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Sebastián Liste
AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PUbLicATiON: Sunday Times Magazine
PHOTO eDiTOr: Patrick Di Nola
"Urban Quilombo."Melanie (22) with her two sons in a small shack in an abandonated chocolate factory in Salvador de Bahia. Despite the lack of socio-economic support from the government, squatters have managed to make a place for themselves to live and form a community of their own, which is safer than the alternatives available to them. However, they are currently being evicted by the government due to being there illegally.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Andrea
Frazzetta


Andrea Frazzetta
AgeNcy: LUZphoto
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr OF PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
PHOTO eDiTOr: Stacey Baker
"Scenes From a Diversion." In late February, a month before violent protests by the military in Burkina Faso prompted President Compaoré to dissolve his government, an enthusiastic crowd swarmed Place des Cinéastes, Ouagadougou as well as a dozen other sites, as part of Fespaco 2011, the Pan-African Film and Television Festival that honors contributions to African cinema. The biannual "African cannes" attracted nearly 8,000 attendees. Many packed the city's soccer stadium, but others in small villages like Pitmoaga, 30 miles west of the capital, were able to watch movies on temporary screens. And for a few hours on each of the festival's eight days, it provided a welcome respite from reality.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Andrea Frazzetta
AgeNcy: LUZphoto
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr OF PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
PHOTO eDiTOr: Stacey Baker
"Scenes From a Diversion." In late February, a month before violent protests by the military in Burkina Faso prompted President Compaoré to dissolve his government, an enthusiastic crowd swarmed Place des Cinéastes, Ouagadougou as well as a dozen other sites, as part of Fespaco 2011, the Pan-African Film and Television Festival that honors contributions to African cinema. The biannual "African cannes" attracted nearly 8,000 attendees. Many packed the city's soccer stadium, but others in small villages like Pitmoaga, 30 miles west of the capital, were able to watch movies on temporary screens. And for a few hours on each of the festival's eight days, it provided a welcome respite from reality.
(Image 2 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Andrea Frazzetta
AgeNcy: LUZphoto
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr OF PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
PHOTO eDiTOr: Stacey Baker
"Scenes From a Diversion." In late February, a month before violent protests by the military in Burkina Faso prompted President Compaoré to dissolve his government, an enthusiastic crowd swarmed Place des Cinéastes, Ouagadougou as well as a dozen other sites, as part of Fespaco 2011, the Pan-African Film and Television Festival that honors contributions to African cinema. The biannual "African cannes" attracted nearly 8,000 attendees. Many packed the city's soccer stadium, but others in small villages like Pitmoaga, 30 miles west of the capital, were able to watch movies on temporary screens. And for a few hours on each of the festival's eight days, it provided a welcome respite from reality.
(Image 3 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Andrea Frazzetta
AgeNcy: LUZphoto
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr OF PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
PHOTO eDiTOr: Stacey Baker
"Scenes From a Diversion." In late February, a month before violent protests by the military in Burkina Faso prompted President Compaoré to dissolve his government, an enthusiastic crowd swarmed Place des Cinéastes, Ouagadougou as well as a dozen other sites, as part of Fespaco 2011, the Pan-African Film and Television Festival that honors contributions to African cinema. The biannual "African cannes" attracted nearly 8,000 attendees. Many packed the city's soccer stadium, but others in small villages like Pitmoaga, 30 miles west of the capital, were able to watch movies on temporary screens. And for a few hours on each of the festival's eight days, it provided a welcome respite from reality.
(Image 4 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Andrea Frazzetta
AgeNcy: LUZphoto
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr OF PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
PHOTO eDiTOr: Stacey Baker
"Scenes From a Diversion." In late February, a month before violent protests by the military in Burkina Faso prompted President Compaoré to dissolve his government, an enthusiastic crowd swarmed Place des Cinéastes, Ouagadougou as well as a dozen other sites, as part of Fespaco 2011, the Pan-African Film and Television Festival that honors contributions to African cinema. The biannual "African cannes" attracted nearly 8,000 attendees. Many packed the city's soccer stadium, but others in small villages like Pitmoaga, 30 miles west of the capital, were able to watch movies on temporary screens. And for a few hours on each of the festival's eight days, it provided a welcome respite from reality.
(Image 5 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Andrea Frazzetta
AgeNcy: LUZphoto
PUbLicATiON: The New York Times Magazine
DirecTOr OF PHOTOgrAPHy: Kathy Ryan
PHOTO eDiTOr: Stacey Baker
"Scenes From a Diversion." In late February, a month before violent protests by the military in Burkina Faso prompted President Compaoré to dissolve his government, an enthusiastic crowd swarmed Place des Cinéastes, Ouagadougou as well as a dozen other sites, as part of Fespaco 2011, the Pan-African Film and Television Festival that honors contributions to African cinema. The biannual "African cannes" attracted nearly 8,000 attendees. Many packed the city's soccer stadium, but others in small villages like Pitmoaga, 30 miles west of the capital, were able to watch movies on temporary screens. And for a few hours on each of the festival's eight days, it provided a welcome respite from reality.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Benedicte
Desrus


Benedicte Desrus
AgeNcy: Sipa Press
PUbLicATiON: Marie Claire South Africa
PHOTO eDiTOr: Zanele Kumalo
Donna Simpson is the world's heaviest woman to give birth. She weighs 630 pounds and wants to weigh more. She maintains a Web site where fans pay to watch her eat and is an advocate for the fat acceptance movement.


PhotoServe/Contact Info
Lynsey
Addario


Lynsey Addario
agency: VII
Publication: National Geographic
Photo eDitor: Sarah Leen
"Baghdad After the Storm." On a bridge over the Tigris a man feeds gulls at dawn as water taxis await the morning's first passengers.
(Image 1 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Lynsey Addario
agency: VII
Publication: National Geographic
Photo eDitor: Sarah Leen
"Baghdad After the Storm." Big weddings costing up to $10,000 have become more common as young people feel safe enough to plan for the future. Some 300 guests celebrated for two days when bride Heelan Muhammad, 23, married Husham Raad, 30, last October. They are saving for a house. Daily life isn't always easy, says 24-year-old Raad Ezat-Khalil (with baby), the groom's cousin and matchmaker, but "the most important thing is how strong and determined people are."
(Image 2 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Lynsey Addario
agency: VII
Publication: National Geographic
Photo eDitor: Sarah Leen
"Baghdad After the Storm." Moviegoers at Baghdad's first 4-D cinema get an extra thrill from shaking seats and wind machines during a 3-D sci-fi film. During the worst years of violence, families stayed home to watch TV or DVDs. Most cinemas closed, as did this one, though it has plans to expand and reopen.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Lynsey Addario
agency: VII
Publication: National Geographic
Photo eDitor: Sarah Leen
"Baghdad After the Storm." By the end of 2010 violence had declined by 90 percent from its peak of 240 incidents a day in 2007. Yet episodic bomb blasts continue, such as the one last November that left 20-year-old Fatima Muhassen Aziz a quadriplegic.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Lynsey Addario
agency: VII
Publication: National Geographic
Photo eDitor: Sarah Leen
"Baghdad After the Storm." A reminder of another war, the Martyr's Monument in eastern Baghdad commemorates the hundreds of thousands of lives lost in iraq's eight-year conflict with Iran in the Eighties. Several Saddam-era monuments—mostly those bearing his likeness—have been torn down since 2003. This one is still carefully tended, though it's currently closed to the public for security reasons.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Lynsey Addario
agency: VII
Publication: National Geographic
Photo eDitor: Sarah Leen
"Baghdad After the Storm." At the end of a long day a cotton candy vendor awaits customers in Zawra Park, home to an amusement park and the city zoo. The park shuts at 11 p.m., an hour before the nightly curfew empties streets and a new day begins.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Alex
Majoli


Alex Majoli
agency: Magnum
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Director of PhotograPhy: Scott Hall
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"Revolution. The Arab Spring." Agony and Ecstasy. Mubarak Steps Down. Protesters in Tahrir Square, crying, chanting, and screaming after listening to the speech in which President Hosni Mubarak said he would not give up power.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Alex Majoli
agency: Magnum
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Director of PhotograPhy: Scott Hall
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"Revolution. The Arab Spring." Egyptians desperate to get a place in the buses after days of traveling to escape violence in Libya. Refugees of different nationalities who were residing in Libya carried their belongings into Tunisia.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Alex Majoli
agency: Magnum
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Director of PhotograPhy: Scott Hall
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"Revolution. The Arab Spring." Ras Jedir border crossing, Tunisia, on March 3, 2011. Following many days of travel, Egyptians board a packed bus, desperate to escape the violence in Libya.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Alex Majoli
agency: Magnum
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Director of PhotograPhy: Scott Hall
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"Revolution. The Arab Spring." Refugees from different nationalities who were residing in Libya carried their belongings back into Tunisia. Among them: Egyptians, Bangladeshi, Chinese, Vietnamese and Sudanese.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Alex Majoli
agency:Magnum
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Director of PhotograPhy: Scott Hall
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"Revolution. The Arab Spring." Tripoli street scene. Alex Majoli covered the Arab Spring Uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya and also chronicled the refugee issue that erupted on the Libyan/Tunisian border.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Alex Majoli
agency: Magnum
Publication: Newsweek
overseas Design Director: Leah Purcell
Director of PhotograPhy: Scott Hall
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
"Revolution. The Arab Spring." Inside the control room of the ex security service, "estikhparat." Alex Majoli covered the Arab Spring Uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Natan
Dvir


Natan Dvir
AgeNcy: Polaris Images
"Same Sex Marriage." Two women kiss outside the Stonewall Inn in Manhattan. Lawmakers voted late Friday, June 24, 2011 to legalize same-sex marriage, making New York the largest state where gay and lesbian couples can wed, giving the national gay-rights movement new momentum.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Natan Dvir
AgeNcy: Polaris Images
"Same Sex Marriage." A gay male couple taking part in the celebrations at the Stonewall Inn in Manhattan following the approval of same-sex marriage in the state of NY. The same-sex marriage bill was approved on a 33 to 29 vote. Thousands of gay people and supporters celebrated outside and inside the Stonewell Inn where the gay-rights movement was born.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Natan Dvir
AgeNcy: Polaris Images
"Same Sex Marriage." Jay Mingle,a man wearing a wedding dress and his friend wearing angle wings goof around with a NYPD policeman while participating in the annual Pride Parade in New York. One of the world's oldest and largest gay pride parades became a victory celebration after New York's historic decision to legalize same-sex marriage.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Natan Dvir
AgeNcy: Polaris Images
"Same Sex Marriage." Pam Hodges, left, takes a picture of Jim Conslontis and Joseph Croza holding their ticket number while waiting to apply for a marriage license in New York City Hall in Manhattan. Jim and Joe have been together for over 31 years since 1980. After previously obtaining a Domestic Partnership Certificate in Miami they finally got married escorted by Pam, their friend in the last 15 years who also served as their witness.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Natan Dvir
AgeNcy: Polaris Images
"Same Sex Marriage." Jim Conslontis, right, and Joseph Croza stand side by side holding their wedding rings during their marriage ceremony at New York City Hall. Jim and Joe were married by Judge Neil Ross (unseen) who serves as a judge in the Criminal Court in Manhattan. Jim said it was only appropriate given that they were considered criminals for over 31 years.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Natan Dvir
AgeNcy: Polaris Images
"Same Sex Marriage." Two men photograph a male couple posing for a picture while waiting to apply for a marriage license in NY City Hall. New York became the largest state allowing same-sex marriages allowing couples to obtain a license and participate in the wedding ceremony. Hundreds of gay couples arrived at New York City Hall in Manhattan to be married after years' of wait.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Weber &
Mastrorillo


Donald Weber and Massimo Mastrorillo
AgeNcy: VII
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
ArT DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
"Inside the Danger Zone." "Mastodon" is a collaborative project between photographers Massimo Mastrorillo and Donald Weber and writer Larry Frolick. Inside the 20-kilometer exclusion zone surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, an undiscovered body lies in the mud. There is no cleanup in the zone; everything remains as it had been on the day of the tsunami.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Donald Weber and Massimo Mastrorillo
AgeNcy: VII
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
ArT DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
"Inside the Danger Zone." "Mastodon" is a collaborative project between photographers Massimo Mastrorillo and Donald Weber and writer Larry Frolick. A devastated road close to the J village. Iwaki, considered by many to be a "nuclear town," is the closest large city to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Donald Weber and Massimo Mastrorillo
AgeNcy: VII
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
ArT DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
"Inside the Danger Zone." "Mastodon" is a collaborative project between photographers Massimo Mastrorillo and Donald Weber and writer Larry Frolick. Inside the twenty kilometer Exclusion Zone surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. A crumbled building on the main street in Odaka in the zone, where people were forced to flee leaving behind homes and businesses and valuables.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Donald Weber and Massimo Mastrorillo
AgeNcy: VII
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
ArT DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
"Inside the Danger Zone." "Mastodon" is a collaborative project between photographers Massimo Mastrorillo and Donald Weber and writer Larry Frolick. Inside the twenty kilometer Exclusion Zone surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. An abandoned laundromat on the main street in Odaka, where all the residents were forced to leave on a moments notice, leaving everything behind.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Donald Weber and Massimo Mastrorillo
AgeNcy: VII
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
ArT DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
"Inside the Danger Zone." "Mastodon" is a collaborative project between photographers Massimo Mastrorillo and Donald Weber and writer Larry Frolick. Inside the twenty kilometer Exclusion Zone surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. A crumbled building on the main street in Odaka in the zone, where people were forced to flee leaving behind homes and businesses and valuables.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Donald Weber and Massimo Mastrorillo
AgeNcy: VII
PUbLicATiON: Newsweek
PHOTO eDiTOr: James Wellford
ArT DirecTOr: Dirk Barnett
"Inside the Danger Zone." "Mastodon" is a collaborative project between photographers Massimo Mastrorillo and Donald Weber and writer Larry Frolick. Inside the twenty kilometer Exclusion Zone surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Charles
Ommanney


Charles Ommanney
Publication: Stern
Photo eDitor: Susanne Lapsien
"The kids are all right." A 16-year-old girl who was raped by her neighbor during heavy fighting around her home listens to her therapist at the Tabish center, a NGO in Kabul, Afghanistan, that specializes in childhood trauma. Barely able to speak or sit in a room with men, this young girl is starting to show signs of improvement through the help of her continued therapy.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Charles Ommanney
Publication: Stern
Photo eDitor: Susanne Lapsien
"The kids are all right." Ataullh, a boy who lost his left arm and left leg in a mine explosion is considered one of the lucky ones although he faces an uncertain future as he sits with his mother and other wounded children in the Italian Emergency hospital in Kabul , Afghanistan. Kabul is the most heavily mined capital city in the World.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Charles Ommanney
Publication: Stern
Photo eDitor: Susanne Lapsien
"The kids are all right." The ICRC hospital and orthopedic centre in downtown Kabul, Afghanistan, June 6th 2011. A very young boy as his father looks on learns to walk again often in great pain in the orthopedic section of the hospital. It is believed he was run over by an American tank during a firefight on the outskirts of the city.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Charles Ommanney
Publication: Stern
Photo eDitor: Susanne Lapsien
"The kids are all right." At the Red Crescent Marastoon orphanage on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, June 7th 2011. Here a young boy who has just arrived at the orphanage struggles in the wind with a mattress he is carrying.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Charles Ommanney
Publication: Stern
Photo eDitor: Susanne Lapsien
"The kids are all right." At the Mine Action center School children watch educational video's and are taught about the dangers of land mines. The classroom is an old converted Russia plane left over from the Soviet era. Also as part of there schooling the local kids are taken on tours of the neighboring mine museum and are shown movies and introduced to what to recognize out in the countryside. Kabul, Afghanistan, June 7th 2011.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Charles Ommanney
Publication: Stern
Photo eDitor: Susanne Lapsien
"The kids are all right." Known only as Boy 1, a child suicide bomber keeps a weary eye on his prison guard in his cell at the juvenile prison in Kabul. He was caught in May of 2011 on the Pakistani border by Afghani police. He had been taken by the Taliban in Pakistan and convinced to travel to the central Kabul bus station strapped with explosives and blow himself up. He is 11 years old.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Benjamin
Lowy


Benjamin Lowy
AGency: Reportage by Getty Images
"iLibya | Uprising by iPhone." Following the model of the arab street revolutionaries in neighboring Egypt and Tunisia, and fueled by social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook, Libyan civilians orchestrated a massive uprising against the 42-year-old reign of Muammar Qaddafi. When a war between rebels and loyalists erupted, curious civilians began to document the rebel movement with their mobile phones, instantly updating the world on events as they transpired. i too was drawn to using my iPhone, an innocuous camera that enabled a far greater intimacy with a subject.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Benjamin Lowy
aGency: Reportage by Getty Images
"iLibya | Uprising by iPhone." The mushroom cloud from an exploding Gaddafi loyalist tank rises into the sky on March 26, 2011 in Ajdabiya, Libya.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Benjamin Lowy
aGency: Reportage by Getty Images
"iLibya | Uprising by iPhone." The bodies of civilian and rebel casualties are stored in the Jala Hospital morgue on March 19 2011 in Bengazi, Libya.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Benjamin Lowy
aGency: Reportage by Getty Images
"iLibya | Uprising by iPhone." A Libyan rebel takes cover behind a sand berm as pro-Gaddafi forces shell their position on March 25 2011 on the outskirts of Ajdabiya, Libya.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Benjamin Lowy
aGency: Reportage by Getty Images
"iLibya | Uprising by iPhone." Suspected Gaddafi loyalist soldiers are pulled from apartments and lined up against a wall in the Abu Salim neighborhood by rebel forces on August 25 2011 in Tripoli, Libya. The suspected loyalist soldiers were made to chant "Allah-O-Akbar" and were repeatedly pushed, punched and shoved by the rebels, before they were driven away in a pickup truck.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Benjamin Lowy
aGency: Reportage by Getty Images
"iLibya | Uprising by iPhone." Rebel soldiers try to rally their comrades with a cry of "Allah Akbar," following a massive retreat in the face of relentless mortar attacks on March 29 2011 in Bin Jawad, Libya.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Laura
Morton


Laura Morton
"The Social Stage." Philanthropist Dede Wilsey (left) talks with Boaz Mazour and Lucy Hamilton during intermission at the San Francisco Opera Opening Night Gala. Arts organizations in San Francisco rely on the patronage of wealthy donors for the majority of their funding.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Laura Morton
"The Social Stage." Susan Tamagni, center, walks to dinner after the cocktail hour with other guests of the Opera Gala. Arts patrons often participate in numerous glamorous social events throughout the year that serve both as fundraisers and a stage for social interaction.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Laura Morton
"The Social Stage." Charlotte Shultz walks past a model dressed for "Samson and Delilah" during the Opera Gala. The galas function as a way to make patrons feel connected to the organizations they support with the hope that they will make large donations.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Laura Morton
"The Social Stage." Vogue Editor in Chief Anna Wintour (center) sits down to dinner with California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom and the actress Mia Wasikowska during a gala for the opening of the exhibit Balenciaga and Spain at the De Young Museum.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Laura Morton
"The Social Stage." Gary Shansby, O.J. Shansby, Yurie Pascarella, Seth Matarasso and Carl Pascarella, left to right, all regular fixtures on the San Francisco social scene, joke around with one another during intermission at the San Francisco Ballet Opening Night Gala.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Laura Morton
"The Social Stage." Deepa Pakianathan dances during the after party for the San Francisco Ballet Opening Gala. Galas have an after party where patrons mix with a younger crowd with the hope they will get interested in the organization and someday become patrons.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Donald
Miralle, Jr.


Donald Miralle, Jr.
PUbLicATiON: ESPN the Magazine
Publisher: ESPN the Magazine
PHOTO eDiTOr: Jim Surber
"Ironman World Championships." A general view of competitors swimming over a school of fish at the mass swim start for the 2011 Ford Ironman World Championship on October 8, 2011 at Kailua Bay in Kona, Hawaii. Considered one of the most grueling races in the world, nearly 2,000 competitors must brave 95 degrees temperature and 90 percent humidity to complete a 3.86 km swim, 180.2 km bike, and a 42.2 km marathon with in an 17 hour time cutoff to be called an "Ironman".
(Image 1 of 6)

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Donald Miralle, Jr.
PUbLicATiON: Mexport
PHOTO eDiTOr: David Leah
"PanAmerican Games." Runners compete in the men's 5,000 meter final during day ten of the XVi Pan American Games at Telcel Athletics Stadium on October 24, 2011, in Guadalajara, Mexico.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Donald Miralle, Jr.
"America's Cup." An aerial view of the start of the America's Cup World Series, San Diego Match Racing Championship Fleet Race on November 16, 2011 at San Diego Bay in San Diego, California.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Donald Miralle, Jr.
PUbLicATiON: Golf Digest
Publisher: Condé Nast
PHOTO eDiTOr: David Leah
"US Open." Matt Kuchar of the USA tees off during a the 2011 U.S. Open Championship held in Bethesda, Maryland at Congressional Country Club on Wednesday, June 15, 2011.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Donald Miralle, Jr.
PUbLicATiON: ESPN the Magazine
Publisher: ESPN the Magazine
PHOTO eDiTOr: Jim Surber
"JAWS." Ross Clarke-Jones a.k.a. "Dark Bones" of Australia drops into a large wave at "Jaws" during storm surf on January 20, 2010 in Peahi, Maui, Hawaii. Clarke-Jones is known for his love of huge waves, and along with tow partner Tony Ray have taken on some of the biggest waves ever attempted.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Donald Miralle, Jr.
PUbLicATiON: ESPN the Magazine
Publisher: ESPN the Magazine
PHOTO eDiTOr: Jim Surber
Match Point." Steven Kehoe #1 of the Ohio State Buckeyes is mobbed by his teammates as Jeff Menzel #1 of the UC Santa Barbara Gauchos and his teammates walk off during the Buckeyes 3-2 (20-25, 25-20, 25-19, 22-25, 15-9) victory in the 2011 NCAA Men's Volleyball Championship Final at Rec Hall in University Park, Pennsylvania on May 7, 2011. Kehoe was named tournament MVP leading Ohio State to it's first national title in volleyball.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Colin
Delfosse


Colin Delfosse
AGeNcy: Out of Focus/Picturetank
"Soviet Legacy in Kazakhstan: Polygons." Lenine statue, former military polygon of Sary Shagan, Kazakhstan. Sary Shagan was a balistic missile test zone spreaded on hundreds kilometers along the Balkash Lake.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Colin Delfosse
AGeNcy: Out of Focus/Picturetank
"Soviet Legacy in Kazakhstan: Polygons." Scrap metal scavenger in the Sary Shagan polygon. In the back, the russian military object n-3D, few months before being sold to a private company for dismantelment.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Colin Delfosse
AGeNcy: Out of Focus/Picturetank
"Soviet Legacy in Kazakhstan: Polygons." The beach on the Balkash Lake. Priozersk used to be a closed town during the USSR. Soldiers' families and commanders working in Sary Shagan Polygon lived there during the Cold War. Today, there is still a majority of Russians in the city.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Colin Delfosse
AGeNcy: Out of Focus/Picturetank
"Soviet Legacy in Kazakhstan: Polygons." Russian soldiers watching a rocket launch at the Baikonur cosmodrome, in western Kazkhstan. Baikonur is the last polygon of Kazakhstan still used by the Russian Army.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Colin Delfosse
AGeNcy: Out of Focus/Picturetank
"Soviet Legacy in Kazakhstan: Polygons." A Russian tourist looks at a former rocket set as a statue in the closed town of Baikonur.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Colin Delfosse
AGeNcy: Out of Focus/Picturetank
"Soviet Legacy in Kazakhstan: Polygons." Russian newlyweds are taken in picture in the shadow of a rocket, Baikonur town.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Fausto
Podavini


Fausto Podavini
PUbLicATiON: Progresso Fotografico
In Italy each year there are 70,000 new patients affected by dementia. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of senile dementia, means losing cognitive capabilities (thought, memory, reasoning). However, losing mental abilities doesn't also mean losing sensitivity. Mirella often hugged and kissed her husband, especially in the tougher moments. Despite her husband's life-threatening disease, Mirella devoted her life to assisting Luigi, trying to be positive and reassuring, looking after him with intense love and respect.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Fausto Podavini
PUbLicATiON: Progresso Fotografico
In Italy each year there are 70,000 new patients affected by dementia. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of senile dementia, means losing cognitive capabilities (thought, memory, reasoning). However, losing mental abilities doesn't also mean losing sensitivity. Mirella often hugged and kissed her husband, especially in the tougher moments. Despite her husband's life-threatening disease, Mirella devoted her life to assisting Luigi, trying to be positive and reassuring, looking after him with intense love and respect.
(Image 2 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Fausto Podavini
PUbLicATiON: Progresso Fotografico
In Italy each year there are 70,000 new patients affected by dementia. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of senile dementia, means losing cognitive capabilities (thought, memory, reasoning). However, losing mental abilities doesn't also mean losing sensitivity. Mirella often hugged and kissed her husband, especially in the tougher moments. Despite her husband's life-threatening disease, Mirella devoted her life to assisting Luigi, trying to be positive and reassuring, looking after him with intense love and respect.
(Image 3 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Fausto Podavini
PUbLicATiON: Progresso Fotografico
In Italy each year there are 70,000 new patients affected by dementia. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of senile dementia, means losing cognitive capabilities (thought, memory, reasoning). However, losing mental abilities doesn't also mean losing sensitivity. Mirella often hugged and kissed her husband, especially in the tougher moments. Despite her husband's life-threatening disease, Mirella devoted her life to assisting Luigi, trying to be positive and reassuring, looking after him with intense love and respect.
(Image 4 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Fausto Podavini
PUbLicATiON: Progresso Fotografico
In Italy each year there are 70,000 new patients affected by dementia. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of senile dementia, means losing cognitive capabilities (thought, memory, reasoning). However, losing mental abilities doesn't also mean losing sensitivity. Mirella often hugged and kissed her husband, especially in the tougher moments. Despite her husband's life-threatening disease, Mirella devoted her life to assisting Luigi, trying to be positive and reassuring, looking after him with intense love and respect.
(Image 5 of 6)

PhotoServe/Contact Info
Fausto Podavini
PUbLicATiON: Progresso Fotografico
In Italy each year there are 70,000 new patients affected by dementia. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of senile dementia, means losing cognitive capabilities (thought, memory, reasoning). However, losing mental abilities doesn't also mean losing sensitivity. Mirella often hugged and kissed her husband, especially in the tougher moments. Despite her husband's life-threatening disease, Mirella devoted her life to assisting Luigi, trying to be positive and reassuring, looking after him with intense love and respect. After 6 years of Alzheimer Luigi died on May 2011, in his house next to his wife and his family.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Heidi
Levine


Heidi Levine
agency: Sipa Press
Photo eDitors: Zafer Akdoganli and Jocelyne Manfredi
"Operation Free Libya." Libyan anti-government rebels during a battle with loyalist fighters of muammar Qaddafi as they try to push forward on the road from ras lanuf towards Bin Jawad on March 9, 2011. But each time they successfully advanced, the rebels were soon forced to retreat. Above: Rebels fire rockets during a battle against fighters loyal to Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Heidi Levine
agency: Sipa Press
Photo eDitors: Zafer Akdoganli and Jocelyne Manfredi
"Operation Free Libya." Libyan anti-government rebels during a battle with loyalist fighters of muammar Qaddafi as they try to push forward on the road from ras lanuf towards Bin Jawad on March 9, 2011. But each time they successfully advanced, the rebels were soon forced to retreat. Above: A Libyan rebel throws himself to the ground while firing at an aircraft flown by a government loyalist above Ras Lanuf. Fierce clashes erupted as the rebels advanced in fits and starts toward the capital,Tripoli.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Heidi Levine
agency: Sipa Press
Photo eDitors: Zafer Akdoganli and Jocelyne Manfredi
"Operation Free Libya." Libyan anti-government rebels during a battle with loyalist fighters of muammar Qaddafi as they try to push forward on the road from ras lanuf towards Bin Jawad on March 9, 2011. But each time they successfully advanced, the rebels were soon forced to retreat. Above: A Libyan rebel fires a recoilless rifle at a government aircraft during heavy clashes with pro- Qaddafi forces on the front line near Brega. The control of Brega, a key eastern oil town, is crucial for the rebel advance.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Heidi Levine
agency: Sipa Press
Photo eDitors: Zafer Akdoganli and Jocelyne Manfredi
"Operation Free Libya." Libyan anti-government rebels during a battle with loyalist fighters of muammar Qaddafi as they try to push forward on the road from ras lanuf towards Bin Jawad on March 9, 2011. But each time they successfully advanced, the rebels were soon forced to retreat. Above: A wounded Libyan rebel, his leg shredded by shrapnel, is evacuated under heavy fire near Bin Jawad between rebel and pro-Qaddafi forces.The two sides are vying for control of the strategic road.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Heidi Levine
agency: Sipa Press
Photo eDitors: Zafer Akdoganli and Jocelyne Manfredi
"Operation Free Libya." Libyan anti-government rebels during a battle with loyalist fighters of muammar Qaddafi as they try to push forward on the road from ras lanuf towards Bin Jawad on March 9, 2011. But each time they successfully advanced, the rebels were soon forced to retreat. Above: An ammunition truck belonging to Qaddafi loyalists erupts in a huge explosion on the main road leading from Benghazi to Ajdabiya. Earlier, NATO forces launched their first air assault on Qaddaffi loyalists advancing on the central city of Benghazi.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Heidi Levine
agency: Sipa Press
Photo eDitors: Zafer Akdoganli and Jocelyne Manfredi
"Operation Free Libya." Libyan anti-government rebels during a battle with loyalist fighters of muammar Qaddafi as they try to push forward on the road from ras lanuf towards Bin Jawad on March 9, 2011. But each time they successfully advanced, the rebels were soon forced to retreat. Above: After months of setbacks, Libyan rebels stun the world with a swift takeover of the capital,Tripoli. An armed rebel leaps from a bronze sculpture of a fist crushing a U.S. fighter plane during celebrations at Qaddafi's Bab Al-Aziziya military compound.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Liu
Jie


Liu Jie
agency: Xinhua News Agency
"The Empty Seats." Two hundred fifty million chinese farmers have flocked to cities to make a living, leaving 20 million elderly people and 58 million children behind in undeveloped rural areas.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Liu Jie
agency: Xinhua News Agency
"The Empty Seats." Two hundred fifty million chinese farmers have flocked to cities to make a living, leaving 20 million elderly people and 58 million children behind in undeveloped rural areas.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Liu Jie
agency: Xinhua News Agency
"The Empty Seats." Two hundred fifty million chinese farmers have flocked to cities to make a living, leaving 20 million elderly people and 58 million children behind in undeveloped rural areas.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Liu Jie
agency: Xinhua News Agency
"The Empty Seats." Two hundred fifty million chinese farmers have flocked to cities to make a living, leaving 20 million elderly people and 58 million children behind in undeveloped rural areas.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Liu Jie
agency: Xinhua News Agency
"The Empty Seats." Two hundred fifty million chinese farmers have flocked to cities to make a living, leaving 20 million elderly people and 58 million children behind in undeveloped rural areas.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Liu Jie
agency: Xinhua News Agency
"The Empty Seats." Two hundred fifty million chinese farmers have flocked to cities to make a living, leaving 20 million elderly people and 58 million children behind in undeveloped rural areas.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Dani
Pozo


Dani Pozo
PuBlication: Tiempo Magazine
agency: Gence France-Presse AFP
"Libean Mukpar, the largest refugee camp of the world." Eight-year-old Somalian refugee Libean Mukpar being placed on the scales at the Médecins sans Frontières Hagadera Hpital in Dadaab, Kenya. Libean weighs less than 15 kilos. Under normal conditions, his weight should be around 26 kilos. Every morning his mother carries him on her back to the scales, where doctors monitor his development. Just a few meters separate the bed from the scales, but his weak legs can't cover this small distance. It takes him great effort even to sit in the black basin where doctors weigh patients; he squints as he looks out at us. There are dozens of cases like Libean's in the hospital, an entire generation condemned to starvation.


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Javier
Arcenillas


Javier Arcenillas
PUBLicATiON: El Periodico de Guatemala
One of the most popular and respected professions in Latin America is that of the Sicarios (assasins). The killers in Guatemala, Salvador and Mexico are recruiting many young people, including minors, who are seduced by how easy it is to earn money and the respect and fear they receive. These young murderers earn respect by intimidating bus drivers and small businesses, where the language of death is heard on any street in the large cities. The experienced killers sell their time and expertise to the most famous Colombian or Mexican drug gangs. Above: A hooded "Sicario" threatens me for a few seconds in zone 14 of Guatemala City.
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Javier Arcenillas
PUBLicATiON: El Periodico de Guatemala
One of the most popular and respected professions in Latin America is that of the Sicarios (assasins). The killers in Guatemala, Salvador and Mexico are recruiting many young people, including minors, who are seduced by how easy it is to earn money and the respect and fear they receive. These young murderers earn respect by intimidating bus drivers and small businesses, where the language of death is heard on any street in the large cities. The experienced killers sell their time and expertise to the most famous Colombian or Mexican drug gangs. Above: Aurora Ramos was executed by a "Sicario" in zone 8 of Guatemala City. Presumably she owed him money.
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Javier Arcenillas
PUBLicATiON: El Periodico de Guatemala
One of the most popular and respected professions in Latin America is that of the Sicarios (assasins). The killers in Guatemala, Salvador and Mexico are recruiting many young people, including minors, who are seduced by how easy it is to earn money and the respect and fear they receive. These young murderers earn respect by intimidating bus drivers and small businesses, where the language of death is heard on any street in the large cities. The experienced killers sell their time and expertise to the most famous Colombian or Mexican drug gangs. Above: 31 year old Karina Marlene was gunned down by 6 shots from a taxi in zone 10 of Guatemala City.
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Javier Arcenillas
PUBLicATiON: El Periodico de Guatemala
One of the most popular and respected professions in Latin America is that of the Sicarios (assasins). The killers in Guatemala, Salvador and Mexico are recruiting many young people, including minors, who are seduced by how easy it is to earn money and the respect and fear they receive. These young murderers earn respect by intimidating bus drivers and small businesses, where the language of death is heard on any street in the large cities. The experienced killers sell their time and expertise to the most famous Colombian or Mexican drug gangs. Above: A "Sicario" is pointing Luis Esteban in the neck with his gun asking for his money back.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Javier Arcenillas
PUBLicATiON: El Periodico de Guatemala
One of the most popular and respected professions in Latin America is that of the Sicarios (assasins). The killers in Guatemala, Salvador and Mexico are recruiting many young people, including minors, who are seduced by how easy it is to earn money and the respect and fear they receive. These young murderers earn respect by intimidating bus drivers and small businesses, where the language of death is heard on any street in the large cities. The experienced killers sell their time and expertise to the most famous Colombian or Mexican drug gangs. Above: SF betrayed his fellow assassins by helping the police apparently after receiving a brutal beating.
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Javier Arcenillas
PUBLicATiON: El Periodico de Guatemala
One of the most popular and respected professions in Latin America is that of the Sicarios (assasins). The killers in Guatemala, Salvador and Mexico are recruiting many young people, including minors, who are seduced by how easy it is to earn money and the respect and fear they receive. These young murderers earn respect by intimidating bus drivers and small businesses, where the language of death is heard on any street in the large cities. The experienced killers sell their time and expertise to the most famous Colombian or Mexican drug gangs. Above: A male corpse found riddled with 9 gunshot wounds.
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Antonio
Bolfo


Antonio Bolfo
Professional Winner of the Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund



AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PHOTO ediTOrs: Christina Cahill and Annick Shen
"Survival in Cite Soleil." People catch a ride on a garbage truck that is on its way to dump fresh garbage in the field. It's first come, first serve, and people fight for spots on the truck.
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Antonio Bolfo
Professional Winner of the Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund



AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PHOTO ediTOrs: Christina Cahill and Annick Shen
"Survival in Cite Soleil." A child works in the trash field herding pigs. The pigs are fed garbage and then are sold in the market for food April 6, 2011.
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Antonio Bolfo
Professional Winner of the Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund



AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PHOTO ediTOrs: Christina Cahill and Annick Shen
"Survival in Cite Soleil." A girl serenely walks through her community April 13, 2011.
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Antonio Bolfo
Professional Winner of the Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund



AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PHOTO ediTOrs: Christina Cahill and Annick Shen
"Survival in Cite Soleil." People catch a ride on a garbage truck that is on the way to dump fresh garbage in the field. It's first come first serve, and people fight for spots on the truck April 6, 2011.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Antonio Bolfo
Professional Winner of the Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund



AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PHOTO ediTOrs: Christina Cahill and Annick Shen
"Survival in Cite Soleil." A child plays with friends around the grounds of the community that lives among the trash. For most of the day, many children work in the garbage collecting food and scrap metal to sell April 6, 2011.
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Antonio Bolfo
Professional Winner of the Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund



AgeNcy: Reportage by Getty Images
PHOTO ediTOrs: Christina Cahill and Annick Shen
"Survival in Cite Soleil." A child prepares to sift through the burning garbage in search of scraps to recycle and sell. Serious burn injuries are very common due to the burning trash falling on people while they search April 13, 2011.
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Antoine
de Ras


Antoine de Ras
PUBLicATiON: The Star
PHOTO ediTOr: Karen Sandison
"Trapped in Transit." A displaced migrant worker sits anxiously on a bus ready to depart from the choucha refugee camp in Tunisia. He is one of thousands who fled the ongoing violence in Libya in search of safety.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Antoine de Ras
PUBLicATiON: The Star
PHOTO ediTOr: Karen Sandison
"Trapped in Transit." A displaced migrant worker sits anxiously on a bus ready to depart from the choucha refugee camp in Tunisia. He is one of thousands who fled the ongoing violence in Libya in search of safety.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Antoine de Ras
PUBLicATiON: The Star
PHOTO ediTOr: Karen Sandison
"Trapped in Transit." A displaced migrant worker sits anxiously on a bus ready to depart from the choucha refugee camp in Tunisia. He is one of thousands who fled the ongoing violence in Libya in search of safety.
(Image 3 of 6)

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Antoine de Ras
PUBLicATiON: The Star
PHOTO ediTOr: Karen Sandison
"Trapped in Transit." A displaced migrant worker sits anxiously on a bus ready to depart from the choucha refugee camp in Tunisia. He is one of thousands who fled the ongoing violence in Libya in search of safety.
(Image 4 of 6)

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Antoine de Ras
PUBLicATiON: The Star
PHOTO ediTOr: Karen Sandison
"Trapped in Transit." A displaced migrant worker sits anxiously on a bus ready to depart from the choucha refugee camp in Tunisia. He is one of thousands who fled the ongoing violence in Libya in search of safety.
(Image 5 of 6)

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Antoine de Ras
PUBLicATiON: The Star
PHOTO ediTOr: Karen Sandison
"Trapped in Transit." A displaced migrant worker sits anxiously on a bus ready to depart from the choucha refugee camp in Tunisia. He is one of thousands who fled the ongoing violence in Libya in search of safety.
(Image 6 of 6)

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Adam
Pretty


Adam Pretty
aGency: Getty Images
"Shanghai 2011 World Swimming Championships." Divers practice during day two of the 14th Fina World championships at the oriental sports center on July 17, 2011, in Shanghai, China.
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Adam Pretty
aGency: Getty Images
"Shanghai 2011 World Swimming Championships." Eric Shanteau of the United States competes in the second semifinal heat of the Men's 200m Breaststroke during Day Thirteen of the 14th FINA World Championships at the Oriental Sports Center on July 28, 2011 in Shanghai, China.
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Adam Pretty
aGency: Getty Images
"Shanghai 2011 World Swimming Championships." Tyler Clary of the United States competes in the Men's 200m Backstroke Final during Day Fourteen of the 14th FINA World Championships at the Oriental Sports Center on July 29, 2011 in Shanghai, China.
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Adam Pretty
aGency: Getty Images
"Shanghai 2011 World Swimming Championships." Michael Phelps of the United States, Takeshi Matsuda of Japan and Yin Chen of China compete in the Men's 200m Butterfly final during Day Twelve of the 14th FINA World Championships at the Oriental Sports Center on July 27, 2011 in Shanghai, China.
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Adam Pretty
aGency: Getty Images
"Shanghai 2011 World Swimming Championships." Italy compete in the Synchronized Swimming Team Tech preliminary round during Day Three of the 14th FINA World Championships at the Oriental Sports Center on July 18, 2011 in Shanghai, China.
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Adam Pretty
aGency: Getty Images
"Shanghai 2011 World Swimming Championships." Competitors warm up ahead of the Synchronized Swimming Team Tech Final during Day Four of the 14th FINA World Championships at the Oriental Sports Center on July 19, 2011 in Shanghai, China.
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Paolo
Marchetti


Paolo Marchetti
Publication: Newsweek
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
overseas DesiGn Director: Leah Purcell
From the article "Gangs in Port-au-Prince," December 2011. The Chimeras are armed gangs linked to the clan of former President Aristide, organized and armed by him to spread terror in Haiti during the 2001 and 2005. These bands have official powers, and in no time become a normal element policy in Haiti during the country's history.
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Paolo Marchetti
Publication: Newsweek
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
overseas DesiGn Director: Leah Purcell
From the article "Gangs in Port-au-Prince," December 2011. The most loved group of rappers named "Positif Rap". The comunities of rappers are always directly linked with the local gang. Texts are always full up of words of freedom and revenge against the political and poverty.
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Paolo Marchetti
Publication: Newsweek
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
overseas DesiGn Director: Leah Purcell
From the article "Gangs in Port-au-Prince," December 2011. The poorest bidonville in Haiti. A member of a gang running away between shacks during a clash between gangs.
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Paolo Marchetti
Publication: Newsweek
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
overseas DesiGn Director: Leah Purcell
From the article "Gangs in Port-au-Prince," December 2011. Franz, right, and Wilner, 26 and 22 years, belongs to the gang of the ghetto named Boston from one year and few months. Franz has lost his brother last year killed by an opposite gang.
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Paolo Marchetti
Publication: Newsweek
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
overseas DesiGn Director: Leah Purcell
From the article "Gangs in Port-au-Prince," December 2011. Watson, 23, a gang boss, looks out from his shack amidst a clash. Cité Soleil, a shanty town, has been called a "microcosm of all the ills of Haitian society," and is home to gang warfare and strife that has been exasperatingly consistent for decades, continuing still in the aftermath of the earthquake.
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Paolo Marchetti
Publication: Newsweek
Photo eDitor: James Wellford
overseas DesiGn Director: Leah Purcell
From the article "Gangs in Port-au-Prince," December 2011. This is the unofficial cemitery of Cité Soleil, without a name, but is the place where usually where they bury the bodies of gang members. This is the tomb of Bily, one of the most famous boss of Chimere of the Haitian history. He was killed supposedly in 2005.
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Goran
Tomasevic


Goran Tomasevic
aGency: Reuters
"The Rebel Road." Rebels hold a young man at gunpoint, who they accuse of being a loyalist to Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, between the towns of Brega and Ras Lanuf, March 3, 2011.
(Image 1 of 6)

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Goran Tomasevic
aGency: Reuters
"The Rebel Road." Anti-Qaddafi fighters fire a multiple rocket launcher near sirte, one of Muammar Qaddafi's last remaining strongholds, September 24, 2011.
(Image 2 of 6)

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Goran Tomasevic
aGency: Reuters
"The Rebel Road." Vehicles belonging to forces loyal to Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi explode after an air strike by coalition forces, along a road between Benghazi and Ajdabiyah March 20, 2011. Creative Team: Goran Tomasevic
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Goran Tomasevic
aGency: Reuters
"The Rebel Road." Injured rebels are helped out of a car during a battle along the road between Ras Lanuf and Bin Jiwad March 8, 2011. Libyan government troops, tanks and warplanes attacked rebels on the western and eastern fronts on Tuesday, pressing their campaign to crush an insurrection against Muammar Gaddafi. In the east, a swathe of which is under rebel control, air strikes targetted rebel positions behind the frontline around the oil town of Ras Lanuf on the Mediterranean coast.
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Goran Tomasevic
aGency: Reuters
"The Rebel Road." Rebel fighters jump away from shrapnel during heavy shelling by forces loyal to Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi near Bin Jawad, March 6, 2011. Rebels in east Libya regrouped on Sunday and advanced on Bin Jawad after forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi ambushed rebel fighters and ejected them from the town earlier in the day.
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Goran Tomasevic
aGency: Reuters
"The Rebel Road." A rebel fighter fires a rocket-propelled grenade launcher in front of a burning gas storage terminal during a battle on the road between Ras Lanuf and Bin Jiwad, March 9, 2011.
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